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Electronic Logging Device Mandate Adds to Truck Driver Shortage Woes

The best approach to solving the driver shortage is for shippers to implement a four-part plan that focuses on young age groups to ensure a steady flow of skilled and energized individuals that see the profession in a new light.

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The best approach to solving the driver shortage is for shippers to implement a four-part plan that focuses on young age groups to ensure a steady flow of skilled and energized individuals that see the profession in a new light.

Most truckload executives and brokers say the productivity hit on the implementation of electronic logging devices by December 2017, will be in the 4-to-7 percent range.

This extended paper details why you should, or rather must adopt electronic logging devices or ELDs, and how you should do it, it will show you how to implement ELDs the right way.

Expectations that trucking demand will increase for cleanup from Hurricane Harvey helped boost shares of Landstar System Inc., YRC Worldwide Inc., and C.H. Robinson Worldwide Inc.

The Supreme Court has declined to hear a legal challenge to the federal government’s electronic logging mandate, making it a near certainty the rule will take effect this December.

Venture capitalists have poured $18 million into a startup that is helping to digitize the long-haul trucking industry, the latest sign that Silicon Valley is eager to take a piece of a $700 billion-a-year sector that has long relied on pencil and paper.

A federal appellate court in Chicago has struck down a legal challenge that was seeking to stop the electronic logging device mandate in its tracks, with a three-judge panel finding no merit to plaintiff’s arguments, describing the electronic logging device rule as “reasonable.”

The ultimate intention of the Electronic Logging Device (ELD) Mandate is to reduce the incidence of driver fatigue-related crashes by facilitating compliance with driver hours of service (HOS) rules.

The recent electronic logging device (ELD) mandate has raised concerns on how it will affect the marketplace.

Time needs to be spent wisely in order to keep up with changing market conditions and an ever-high commitment to service quality, two things which always require watchful eyes.

The upfront purchase and installation costs of an electronic logging device results in about a 7 to 10 percent loss in productivity, but once you get up to speed and learn what you can and cannot do, the productivity loss falls to about 3 to 4 percent.

The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association, which represents tens of thousands of truckers, is mounting a legal challenge to a new federal requirement for drivers to electronically log their hours behind the wheel.

The trucking industry is waiting on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to publish its final electronic logging device rule, or ELD mandate - What is it exactly? And, what does it mean for commercial motor carriers and truck drivers?