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Trade Relations are Building a Bigger Wall Between US & China

The tête-à-tête regarding trade between China and the US, the world’s two largest economies, has reached a new level.

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The heightened and somewhat frenetic pace of tariff activity is ostensibly full-throttle all the time these days, and this week’s events are clearly no exception. Where to begin? Well, for starters President Trump yesterday announced that the United States plans to place tariffs on $200 billion worth of imports from China, which will take effect on September 24, 2018 at an initial amount of 10%, with the additional level of tariffs increasing to 25%, effective January 1.

As global shippers are painfully aware, keeping on top of the shifting trade agreement banter and subsequent disruptions has added a new layer of complexity to logistics management. Leading analysts from all sides of global networks are sharing their perspectives to help shippers get a handle on the new reality.

The tête-à-tête regarding trade between China and the US, the world’s two largest economies, has reached a new level.

Given all the recent back and forth tariff activity going on between the U.S. and China, it is worth noting that on Friday, July 6 the U.S. began imposing tariffs of 25% on around $34 billion worth of Chinese products, which USTR said were made in “response to unfair Chinese practices.” These tariffs, said USTR will eventually cover up to $50 billion in Chinese imports, with the products targeted by the tariffs comprised of those benefiting from China’s industrial policy and forced technology transfer practices.

Today’s manufacturers face seemingly competing challenges to meet customer expectations for fresh inventory offered via multiple platforms while relying on increasingly global supplier networks.

The Trump administration on Friday escalated a trade war between the world’s two largest economies, moving ahead with tariffs on $50 billion of Chinese goods and provoking an immediate tit-for-tat response from Beijing.

In a wide-ranging statement, the White House said that under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974, the United States will impose tariffs on goods containing industrially significant technology, including those related to the ‘Made in China 2025’ program.

Any thoughts that a “trade war” between the United States and China was not a possibility were put to rest earlier today based on an announcement coming out of the White House. The White House said that under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974, “the United States will impose a 25% tariff on $50 billion of goods imported from China containing industrially significant technology, including those related to the ‘Made in China 2025’ program.”

Apparel company now is looking to expand to further solidify its competitive advantages to and from China.

As we flip the calendar to 2018, companies with global supply chains should keep their eyes and ears open for these primary concerns.

Maximal, which had 2016 revenues of approximately $66 million from sales of nearly 6,000 units, specializes in utility and standard segments in China.

AsiaInspection (AI), a global provider of quality control services for businesses importing from the Pacific Rim, maintains that logistics managers should pay more attention to risk—irrespective of region.

Panama, one of the few countries to recognize Taiwan’s sovereignty, has cut ties with the island and forged relations with China, adding there there was “only one China” of which Taiwan was a part.

According to “Global Logistics 2017,” a recent report released by the London think-tank Transport Intelligence (Ti), the overall contract logistics market is estimated to have grown by 3.9% in real terms in 2016.

UPS and SF Holding, the parent company of leading integrated express logistics service provider in China, SF Express, said they plan to launch a joint venture, focusing on developing and providing international delivery services.