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Differences between Omnichannel & Omnichannel 2.0

Unlike the original definition of Omnichannel, Omnichannel 2.0 is about bringing the entire enterprise together, not just enabling support within legacy systems for an omnichannel approach, retailers and supply chain leaders must increase proficiency across all channels, engaging with consumers and personalizing the shopping experience.

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Unlike the original definition of Omnichannel, Omnichannel 2.0 is about bringing the entire enterprise together, not just enabling support within legacy systems for an omnichannel approach, retailers and supply chain leaders must increase proficiency across all channels, engaging with consumers and personalizing the shopping experience.

This white paper describes how, from retailers to manufacturers, as well as every business involved in sales in between, the omnichannel supply chain is a goal to achieve.

If you ordered gifts using Amazon Prime, you weren’t alone, the online retailer says it shipped more than 1 billion items for free in the United States with its Prime service during this holiday season.

In this white paper, you will learn what supply chain leaders need to understand why logistics fundamentals will continue to shape the e-commerce shipping strategy and how to master e-commerce logistics.

Companies must embrace the combined nature of omnichannel to realize its benefits, and the same is true of combined less-than-truckload and e-commerce shipping strategies.

LTL carriers have always been seen as a way to navigate tight capacity in full truckload, but the increased use of LTL capacity today means the ability to respond to on-demand shipping is diminished.

As capacity becomes a greater commodity in LTL, shippers need to start working to expand their LTL carrier options and find the carriers that can move freight promptly and at the right price.

This exclusive, & educational white paper is for shippers who are accustomed to shipping LTL freight or are starting to ship more LTL freight, it addresses capacity woes, use of last-mile delivery, and how to choose the right LTL carrier.

This white paper is a must-read for shippers who are seeking information on the less than truckload pricing market in order to plan for 2019.

Higher driver turnover in 2019 will be inevitable, and with less than two months remaining in 2018, the best thing carriers and shippers can do today is to work on reducing the burden and stress on drivers.

Unfortunately, the use of Less-Than-Truckload DIM pricing is often overlooked for a simple reason; DIM pricing is usually associated with overnight shipping and parcels, not LTL.

This is a must-read for shippers who are either LTL shipping pros, new LTL shippers who are needing education, or those moving more freight to the LTL mode as Full Truckload feels the capacity crunch squeeze.

Shippers need to understand what’s contributing to a higher than usual Less-than-Truckload peak season and how to prepare for it and keep freight spend in check.

The LTL market will climb nearly 15 percent between Q4 of 2018 and 2019, but the uncertainty and gradual push away from FT to LTL, as well as intermodal shipping, could snap that prediction, ultimately, we are sure of one thing; LTL growth will continue.

As more shippers move away from full truckload, less than truckload demand will rise sharply, and rates will increase much faster than anticipated, so what makes LTL superior, and why exactly does LTL have extra capacity?